The Rogozen treasure

The Rogozen Treasure, Vratza District has been discovered in the centre of the village of Rogozen. The treasure consists of 108 phials, 54 jugs, 2 cups and 1 scyfos. All the objects in the treasure are 165 as 131 of them have gold coating. The total weight of the treasure is 19.91 kg. There is an inscription at the neck of over 13 vessels telling that they belong to the Odrysian king Kotyu I, who has ruled in the years 383 - 360 B.C. and his heir Kerseblept, ruling from 359 to 340 B.C. There is one inscription mentioning the name of prince Satok, son of Sitalk.

The jug from the Rogozen treasure is made of silver and is 11.5 cm high, with a diameter of 8 cm, weighing 127.2 grams. It dates back to the end of V c. B.C. The body of the jug is divided into two unequal parts via a band. In the central part of the wider section there is depicted a winged goddess. She is standing upright with a disproportional huge head, wearing a heels-long hiton. She is holding a dog in each hand, which are looking backwards. Two winged centaurs are galloping towards her. At the lower frieze there is depicted a bull attacked at both sides by infuriated dogs. The bull, the dogs and the centaurs in combination with the Great Goddess represent a typical Thracian scene. The sacred animals in Ancient Greece are the lion, the dogs and the deer.

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The Rogozen treasure – A phial from the set of the Odrysian kings

The Rogozen treasure – A phial from the set of the Odrysian kings

The jug from the set of the ODrysian kings is made of silver with gold coating. It is 13.5 cm high, with a diameter of 8.5 cm and a weight of 234.9 grams. It dates back to the first half of the V c. B.C. The body of the jug is engirdled with a figural frieze. There is a mirror image of the bare-footed Thracian virgin goddess, riding a huge cat in an Amazonian style (a panther or a mountainous lion). In her right hand she is holding a bow and an arrow and in her left hand she is hugging the neck of the animal. She is wearing a long short-sleeved hiton. Between the two mirror images of the goddess there is another scene - of a lion attacking a deer.

The jug from the set of the Odrysian kings is made of silver. The vessel is 12 cm high, with a diameter of 8.3 cm and weighing 134.8 grams. It dates back to the first half of the IV c. B.C. The figural frieze is a relief one and represents two opposite standing winged chariots with hanging chassis and seats. The winged horses are on their hind legs. One of the chariots is guided by the Great Goddess with the Thracian Goddess behind her, holding a bow in her left hand. In the other chariot the roles are changed: the Virgin Goddess is the charioteer and the Great Goddess is holding a twig with seven blossoms.

The Phial from the set of the Odrysian kings is made of silver with gold coating. The phial is 2 cm high, 13.6 cm in diameter and a weight of 184 grams. It dates back to 339 B.C. The idea of the represented scene can be understood from the inscription on the phial. The princess of Tegeya, Avge, daughter of the Arcadian king Aley and the priestess Athens of Aleya is depicted almost undressed, struggling against a violator. The violator is the drunken Heracles, depicted naked with a wreath on his head, holding the struggling Avge with his right hand.

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